TRAINING.

Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) Technology

Online /
May 29 - 31, 2024 /
Course Code: 14-0417-ONL24

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  • Overview
  • Syllabus
  • Instructor

Overview

Please note, This instructor-led course has specific dates and times:
This course is held online over 3 days on the following schedule (All times in Eastern Time Zone):

9:30 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (Will include the usual breaks)

After Attending This Course, You Will Be Able To:

  • Identify the needs of power systems and utility networks where installation of FACTS Controllers/Devices becomes essential
  • Compute the power transmission capability of a transmission system and apply reactive compensation methods for its improvement
  • Comprehend the operating principles, control systems and modelling of different FACTS Controllers
  • Understand the influence of measurement systems, network resonances and harmonic interactions on the performance of FACTS control systems
  • Apply the techniques of FACTS controller design for enhancing power transfer, increasing stability, augmenting system damping, mitigating sub-synchronous resonances, preventing voltage instability, performing load compensation, etc.
  • Analyze the interactions among various FACTS Controllers
  • Utilize techniques for the coordination of FACTS Devices within power systems
  • Plan the placement of FACTS Devices in the utility networks.

Description
Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) technology is fast becoming an integral component of modern power transmission systems worldwide. The stability of the power system and controllability of transmission line power flows are emerging as key issues in ensuring stable and secure power system operation. FACTS offers a rapid, effective and reliable solution by controlling high-power electronic devices. Several FACTS Controllers/Devices are already installed and are being planned by utilities in various provinces in Canada, the US and around the world. Their presence is likely to grow even further with the enhanced restructuring of power systems and the rapid integration of renewable energy systems, such as wind and solar plants, in power systems.

BULK Electrical System Stability; Regulation of the Active and Reactive Power; as well as voltage regulation and load sharing via power electronic converters are key factors that are explained with practical examples and a case study in this cutting-edge technology course.

Course Outline

  • Introduction To Facts
  • Principles of Conventional Reactive Power Compensators
  • Principles of Static Var Compensator (SVC)
  • Static Var Compensator (SVC) Control Components and Models
  • Concepts of Voltage Control by Static Var Compensator
  • Applications of Static Var Compensators (SVC)
  • Thyristor Controlled Series Capacitor (TCSC)
  • Applications of Thyristor Controlled Series Capacitor (TCSC)
  • Coordination of Facts Controllers
  • Voltage Source Converter (VSC) Based Facts Controllers

Who Should Attend
Transmission Engineers and Planners, Electrical Utility Engineers, Managers, Power System Designers, Distribution Engineers, Station Operators, and other technical personnel should attend this course. This course will be valuable for those challenged with the issues of voltage regulation, power system stability, and load compensation in power transmission/distribution systems and looking for state-of-the-art solutions for solving these power system problems.

More Information

Time: 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM Eastern Time


Please note: You can check other time zones here.

Syllabus

Day I

INTRODUCTION TO FACTS
1.1. Electrical Transmission Networks
1.2. Reactive Power Needs of Transmission Lines
1.3. Power Flow in Transmission Lines
1.4. Power System Stability
1.5. Need for FACTS
1.6. High Voltage DC (HVDC) Transmission

PRINCIPLES OF CONVENTIONAL REACTIVE POWER COMPENSATORS
2.1. Synchronous Condensers
2.1.1. Configuration 
2.1.2. Applications
2.1.2.1. Control of large voltage excursions
2.1.2.2. Dynamic reactive power support at HVDC Terminals  
2.2. Saturated Reactor (SR)
2.2.1. Configuration 
2.2.2. Operating Characteristics

PRINCIPLES OF STATIC VAR COMPENSATOR (SVC)
3.1. Thyristor Controlled Reactor (TCR)
3.1.1. Single-Phase Thyristor Controlled Reactor
3.1.2. Three-Phase Thyristor Controlled Reactor
3.1.3. Thyristor Switched Reactor (TSR)
3.1.4. Segmented TCR
3.1.5. Twelve-Pulse Thyristor Controlled Reactor
3.1.6. Operating Characteristics of a TCR 
3.2. Thyristor Controlled Transformer (TCT)
3.3. Fixed Capacitor - Thyristor Controlled Reactor (FC-TCR)
3.3.1. Configuration
3.3.2. Operating characteristics 
3.4. Mechanically Switched Capacitor –Thyristor Controlled Reactor (MSC-TCR)
3.5. Thyristor Switched Capacitor (TSC)
3.5.1. Switching a capacitor to a voltage source
3.5.2. Switching a series connection of capacitor and reactor
3.5.3. Turnoff of TSC valve
3.5.4. Configuration
3.5.5. Operating Characteristics    
3.6. Thyristor Switched Capacitor - Thyristor Controlled Reactor (TSC-TCR)  
3.6.1. Configuration
3.6.2. Operating characteristic
3.6.3. Mismatched TSC and TCR   
3.7. Comparison of Different Static Var Compensators 
3.7.1. Losses  
3.7.2. Performance  

STATIC VAR COMPENSATOR (SVC) CONTROL COMPONENTS AND MODELS
4.1. SVC Control System
4.2. Measurement Systems
4.2.1. Voltage measurement
4.2.2. Demodulation effect of voltage measurement system
4.2.3. Current measurement 
4.2.4. Power measurement
4.3. Basic voltage regulator
4.3.1. Digital implementation of voltage regulator 
4.4. Gate Pulse Generation
4.5. Linearizing function
4.6. Delays in the firing system
4.7. Synchronizing System
4.8. Additional Control and Protection Functions
4.8.1. Susceptance (reactive power) regulator 
4.8.2. Control of neighbouring var devices
4.8.3. Undervoltage strategies
4.9. Modeling of SVC for Power System Studies
4.9.1. Modeling for load flow studies
4.9.2. Modeling for small and large disturbance studies
4.9.3. Modeling for electromagnetic transient studies 

Day II
         
CONCEPTS OF VOLTAGE CONTROL BY STATIC VAR COMPENSATOR
5.1. Voltage Control by SVC
5.1.1. V-I  Characteristics of  SVC
5.1.2. Advantages of slope in SVC dynamic characteristics
5.2. Influence of  SVC on system voltage
5.3. Design of  SVC voltage regulator 
5.4. Effect of  Network Resonances on Controller  Response
5.5. Sensitivity to power system parameters
5.6. Sensitivity to TCR operating point
5.7. Methods for Improving Voltage Controller Response
5.7.1. Manual gain switching
5.7.2. Nonlinear gain
5.7.3. Bang-bang control 
5.7.4. Gain supervisor
5.8. Harmonic Interactions between SVC and AC Network
5.9. Application of SVC to Series Compensated AC Systems  
5.9.1. AC system resonant modes
5.9.1.1. Shunt capacitance resonance
5.9.1.2. Series line resonance
5.9.1.3. Shunt-reactor resonance
5.10. Voltage Controller Design Studies
5.10.1. Modeling aspects 
5.10.2. Special performance evaluation studies
5.10.3. Study methodologies for controller design
  
APPLICATIONS OF STATIC VAR COMPENSATORS (SVC)
6.1. Increase in Steady State Power Transfer Capacity
6.2. Enhancement of Transient Stability
6.2.1. Power Angle Curves
6.2.2. Uncompensated system
6.2.3. SVC compensated system
6.3. Augmentation of Power System Damping
6.3.1. Principle of SVC Auxiliary Control
6.3.2. Design of an SVC Power Swing Damping Controller (PSDC)
6.3.3. Selection criteria for PSDC input signals
6.3.4. SVC PSDC requirements
6.3.5. Design procedure for PSDC
6.3.6. Composite Signals for Damping Control
6.4. Mitigation of Subsynchronous Resonance 
6.4.1. Principle of SVC Control
6.4.2. Configuration and Design of SVC Controller
6.5. Prevention of Voltage Instability
6.5.1.   Principle of SVC Control
6.5.2.   Configuration and Design of SVC Controller
6.6. Improvement of HVDC Link Performance
6.6.1.  Principle and Application of SVC Control
6.6.2. Voltage regulation
6.6.2.1.  Suppression of temporary overvoltages
6.6.2.2.  Support during recovery from large disturbances
6.7. Load Compensation
6.7.1. Power Factor Correction
6.7.2. Load Balancing

THYRISTOR CONTROLLED SERIES CAPACITOR (TCSC)
7.1. Series Compensation
7.1.1. Fixed Series Compensation
7.1.2. Need for Variable Series Compensation
7.1.3. Advantages of TCSC
7.2. TCSC Controller
7.3. TCSC Operation
7.3.1. Basic Principle
7.3.2. Modes of TCSC Operation
7.3.2.1. Bypassed thyristors mode
7.3.2.2. Blocked thyristors mode
7.3.2.3. Partially-conducting thyristors or Vernier mode
7.4. Thyristor Switched Series Capacitor (TSSC)
7.5. Analysis of TCSC
7.6. Capability Characteristics
7.6.1. Single Module TCSC 
7.6.2. Multimodule TCSC
7.7. Harmonic Performance
7.8. Losses
7.9. Response of TCSC
7.10. Modeling of TCSC
7.10.1. Variable Reactance Model
7.10.2. Transient Stability Model


Day III

APPLICATIONS OF THYRISTOR CONTROLLED SERIES CAPACITOR (TCSC)
8.1. Open Loop Control
8.2. Closed Loop Control
8.2.1. Constant Current Control
8.2.2. Constant Current Control
8.2.3. Enhanced Current Control
8.2.4. Enhanced Power Control
8.3. Improvement of Stability
8.4. Enhancement of System Damping
8.5. Principle of Damping 
8.5.1. Bang Bang Control 
8.5.2. Auxiliary signals for TCSC Modulation 
8.5.3. Selection of measurement signals
8.6. Mitigation of SSR
8.6.1. TCSC Impedance at Subsynchronous Frequencies
8.6.2. Case Study  
8.7. Prevention of Voltage Collapse
 
COORDINATION OF FACTS CONTROLLERS
9.1. Controller Interactions
9.1.1. Steady State Interactions
9.1.2. Electromechanical Oscillation Interactions
9.1.3. Controller Oscillation Mode Interactions
9.1.4. Subsynchronous Resonance Interactions
9.1.5. High-Frequency Interactions
9.2. SVC-SVC Interaction
9.2.1. Effect of Electrical Coupling and Short Circuit Levels
9.2.2. Systems without Series Compensation
9.2.3. Systems with Series Compensation
9.2.4. High-Frequency Interactions
9.3. SVC-HVDC Interaction
9.4. SVC-TCSC Interaction
9.4.1. TCSC-PSDC with Bus Voltage Input signal
9.4.2. TCSC-PSDC with System Angle Input Signal
9.4.3. High-Frequency Interactions
9.5. TCSC-TCSC Interaction
9.5.1. Effect of Loop Impedance
9.5.2. High-Frequency Interaction
9.6. Performance Criteria for Damping Controller Design
9.7. Coordination of Multiple Controllers
9.7.1. Basic Procedure for Controller Design
9.7.2.   Enumeration of System Performance Specifications
9.7.3. Selection of Measurement and Control Signals
9.7.4. Validation of Design and Performance Evaluation
 
VOLTAGE SOURCE CONVERTER (VSC)  BASED FACTS CONTROLLERS
10.1. Static Synchronous Compensator –STATCOM
10.1.1. Principle of Operation
10.1.2. V-I Characteristic 
10.1.3. Harmonic Performance
10.1.4. Applications
10.2.   Static Synchronous Series Compensator –SSSC
10.2.1.  Principle of Operation
10.2.2.  Control System
10.2.3.  Applications
10.3. Unified Power Flow Controller –UPFC
10.3.1.  Principle of Operation 
10.3.2.  Applications
10.4. Comparative Evaluation of Different  FACTS Controllers
10.4.1. Performance Comparison 
10.4.2. Cost Comparison 
10.5. FACTS Controllers with Energy Storage
10.5.1. Principle of Operation
10.5.2. Applications
10.6. Future Directions of FACTS Technology
10.6.1. Role of communications 
10.6.2. Control design issues

Instructor

Eduard Loiczli, P.Eng.

Dr. Eduard Loiczli is a Senior Electrical Engineer with over 30 years of experience in motors and drives. His most outstanding contributions are related to the development of a High-Speed Magnetic Levitation System, Vector Control System for Streetcars and Subways, and Medium Voltage 4.16Kv Drive for up to 4.5MW Induction Motor.




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Fee & Credits

$1995 + taxes

  • 2.1 Continuing Education Units (CEUs)
  • 21 Continuing Professional Development Hours (PDHs/CPDs)
  • ECAA Annual Professional Development Points
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