TRAINING.

Planning and Design Safer Roads for Pedestrians and Cyclists

Online /
Apr 6 - 8, 2022 /
Course Code: 12-0439-ONL22

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  • Overview
  • Syllabus
  • Instructor

Overview

Please note, This instructor-led course has specific dates and times:
This course is held online over 3 days on the following schedule (All times in Eastern Time Zone):

9:30 am to 12:15 pm Eastern Time (Will include a 15 minute break)

After participating in this course, you will be able to:

  • Comprehend the holistic planning and design for pedestrians and cyclists
  • Understand the most common principles, planning process, design techniques of active transportation
  • Analysis of facility, details of designing key components and facility development, geometric issues
  • Performing data collection, audits, safety analysis and vision zero approach and techniques that make facility safety by design

Description
This course covers methods and best practices used by professional planners, engineers, and consultants/researchers This course does not focus on advocacy; rather, it introduces current approaches to planning for bicycle and pedestrian safety. A key objective of this course is to help you become better ped/bike practitioners. The course is broadly divided in three parts

Part 1: The point of this course (or involving oneself in bicycle and pedestrian planning) is not to spend time preaching to the choir. Rather, it is important to learn how to measure and justify bicycle and pedestrian improvements to local authorities, elected officials, transportation staff, and citizens.

Part 2: This section of the course focuses on the varying characteristics of pedestrians and bicyclists that will need to be considered in the planning profession. It will include facility design needs, important safety considerations, and aspects of the connection between land use and transportation planning, including planning for accessibility for all types of pedestrians.

Part 3: This section will focus on the elements of pedestrian and bicycle plans – what they are, what their purpose it, and how they are created, implemented, evaluated, and updated.

Readings in the syllabus are divided into 2 groups: 1. The ones that apply to the day’s lecture, 2. The ones that should be on the shelf of a ped/bike professional. Readings in the syllabus are also prioritized so that students can devote time to the most important ones. 

Course Outline

  • Introduction to active transportation,
  • Fundamentals of planning and design,
  • Benefits and Challenges of active transportation planning and design,
  • Health vs. risk: Safety analysis, audits, trends, vision zero principles
  • Data collection, measurement, facility analysis
  • Pedestrian planning: Master plan, demand, supply and implementation, land-use planning for active transportation
  • Pedestrian design: Part 1 – Basic elements, principles of design (TAC 6, NACTO, Complete Street)
  • Pedestrian design: Part 2 – Detail design of key components (OTM Book 15, ITE)
  • Bicycle Planning: Master plan, demand, supply, land-use planning and implementation
  • Bicycle design: Part 1 – Basic elements, principles of design (TAC 5, NACTO, Complete Street)
  • Bicycle design: Part 2 – Detail design of key components (OTM Book 18, MTO manual, Protected and Interchange ITE)
  • Shared facility: Trail, path, boulevard
  • Developing policies and impact
  • Capital plan, implementation, monitoring, evaluation of system

Who Should Attend
Planners • Municipal Engineers • Supervisors • Managers • Construction Managers • Educators • Students

More Information

Time: 9:30 AM - 12:15 PM Eastern Time


Please note: You can check other time zones here.

Syllabus

Day 1: Introduction and Fundamentals

  • System approach to active transportation
  • Fundamental principles: Complete streets, city policy, active transportation planning steps, basic design principles
  • Substantiable safety, vision zero principles, fundamental of safety, health and benefits assessment

Day 2: Pedestrian Planning and Design

  • Pedestrian types, facility types, data sources and collection, what to measure, evaluation criteria
  • Pedestrian demand process, trip generation, trip distribution, assignment and facility demand projections,
  • Selection of treatment or facility type, area pedestrian facility planning, facility supply planning, phased implementation approach
  • Complete street design principles, variation in design for built form
  • Introduction to design elements of pedestrian facility using ITE, NACTO, TAC and other design guidelines and best practices, minimum maintenance standards
  • Future proof pedestrian design facility: shared with micro devices, autonomous mobility regime.
  • Details of design elements: Sidewalk, walkway, trails, connectors, crosswalk, mid-block crosswalk, intersection corners and waiting areas, safety buffer, facility scale using demand

Day 3: Bicycle Planning and Design

  • Bicycle types, facility types, data sources and collection, what to measure, facility treatment evaluation process and criteria’s
  • Bicycle (shared and private) demand process, trip generation, trip distribution, assignment and facility demand projections,
  • Selection of bicycle facility type, area cycling network planning, facility supply planning, phased implementation approach
  • Complete street design principles, variation in design for built form and street types
  • Introduction to design elements of bicycle facility using Ontario design manuals, ITE, NACTO, TAC and other design guidelines and best practices for maintenance and operation, minimum maintenance standards
  • Preparing for future: shared micromobility, autonomous mobility regime.
  • Details of design elements: Paved shoulder, standard bike lane, buffered bike lane, protect bike lanes and intersections, shared trails, connectors, cross ride, mid-block crossing signal, basics of pedestrian signal, waiting areas and bike box design, safety buffer, facility scale using demand

Instructor

Dewan Karim, P.Eng., PTOE

Educated at the University of Tokyo, Japan, Dewan spent more than sixteen years of his career in mobility master planning, smart innovation in urban innovation, shared mobility and transit planning projects in both Japan and Canada. Recently, he developed a new innovative mobility ecosystem master planning concept combining new mobility systems, innovative technologies, equitable use of public space, sustainable safety, and evidence based scientific approach for rebuilding cities for people. The project concept and innovative applications was awarded by MIT Media Lab conference as “best planning system” and ITE Project of year in 2015. Subsequently, he published a chapter of “Disrupting Mobility”, published by Springer University of California, Berkeley and currently writing a book titled “Our Mobility DNA” with Taylor and Francis and teaching professional course to summarize innovative mobility concepts and outcome of urban master planning projects. He is a registered member as a Professional Engineer in Ontario, British Columbia, Nova scotia and certified as a Professional Traffic Operation Engineer.




The Engineering Institute of Canada AIBC Approved   
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Fee & Credits

$695 + taxes

  • 0.75 Continuing Education Units (CEUs)
  • 7.5 Professional Development Hours (PDHs)
  • ECAA Annual Professional Development Points
  • This course has been approved by the AIBC for 7.5 Non-Core Learning Units
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